Parental Advice

DigCit PLN Logo

Through curating these Pokemon Go articles we noticed that the initial reaction was extremely positive but the more negative stories started to appear an article called Pokemon GO, kids and school: a new challenge for parents and teachers provides some Digital Literacy lessons by explaining the media cycle.

In the first 24 hours all the stories about about Pokemon GO were positive; about how amazing the game is. But journalists can’t keep writing that same story as it’s boring and nobody will read it

there will be a thousand more negative stories to emerge because Pokemon GO is a hot topic and media organisations are desperate for content parents will click on

So why ignore them? Because most of them come under the category of “life happens.” Yes your child may trip while going for a walk.

But so is sitting in their bedroom constantly leading a sedentary lifestyle with little natural light.

Much of the parental advice that we have read highlights the need to train our students and young people to be digitally savvy and safe. Pokemon Go could be a great way for educators to engage partners on the issue of Digital Citizenship

maria PokemonGo was internationally launched with the arrival of  summer vacation for half of the world, meaning the decision to  let kids download and use the app was up to parents. News  around the world were massively focused on how great  augmented reality was, then on how dangerous the game was  since users did not pay attention to anything else; then news talked about how families could play together, so it was all good again; and then social media were flooded with messages suggesting our kids would be slaves to the game. Is it good? Is it bad? Is it positive? Is it dangerous? Am I the kind of parent who will ban the use of the game or the kind of parent who does not really care about how the kids play with it? What should we believe? 

Children go back to school now and this report is a phenomenal summary of everything important teachers need to know about the game, its virtues and flaws and a set of common-sense recommendations for a balanced, safe use. If only us parents realized how relevant it is that we share that same knowledge. If teachers and parents share a DigCit goal, it will be so much easier for children to grow in a physical environment that encourages a safe and smart digital life.  As parents, we may not be experts on VR or AR and maybe we don’t know what Pokemon is (though it’s as old a name as many of us), and we may not care about apps or games or cellphones or digital stuff. But this is the world our children live in, so we should definitely care about them living it well.  Children have a first teacher in their parents, so reading this report is basic to create a personal opinion about the game and about a coherent approach to how our families adopt and adapt to technology. The conversation is about safety and health and moderation, but it also about responsibility, collaboration and connection; the report covers it all in detail, puts all perspectives in the box and lets you make your own conclusions. Extremely useful! María Zabala | Communications Advisor | specialist in families and technology | DigCit Parent advocate

 

Pokemon Go A Parents Guide

 

we examine what parents can do to combat Pokemon danger

The general lack of awareness players have for the world around them has led to accidents

The immersive nature of the game may make some players more trusting of strangers if they are fellow gamers, but children still need to apply the same safety rules that they would use for online gaming.

A game that makes children exercise and talk to each other and one that adds a fresh perspective to familiar surroundings shouldn’t be demonised

But you need to ensure that your child is aware of the dangers before playing and remain safe while using it

Give it a try yourself

Let them know that they don’t have to walk around while staring at the map on the screen

Let them know that you don’t have to visit a Pokemon’s exact location to capture it – you can stop at a nearby area where it’s safe

As with online gaming aliases, remind your child to choose a username that won’t identify either them or where they live

this feature basically gives people the power to lure a group of kids to a certain spot for 30 minutes, so you’ll need to use your judgement and set rules with your child about how to handle this situation if it occurs.

Remind them to save some phone battery for the journey home

Is Pokemon GO Safe for Kids? A Guide for Parents

What we thought we’d do this week is take a look at what almost no parents are going to read – the fine print

First of all, the age limit is 13. There is an age gate, and new users are asked to enter their birth date. If your child entered an age under 13, he would have been prompted to get your parental consent

You can’t sue

Agreeing to the TOS means that in the event of a dispute, you’ve waived your right to sue Niantic and the other companies involved

Treat other players and bystanders with respect and courtesy, and conduct yourself in an appropriate manner while playing Pokemon GO

We will review reported or flagged player accounts and content and will determine whether or not they violate the Terms of Use and/or these guidelines

Accounts are penalized for violations of the Terms of Use and/or the Trainer guidelines—we may issue a warning, suspend you from the game, or (for serious or repeated violations) terminate your account.

 the game looks relatively safe to us

Pokemon GO, kids and school: a new challenge for parents and teachers

Like many new technological things, it can seem like some things will be short lived fads that actually develop into something bigger changing how we live life completely, and I suspect Pokemon GO might just be one of these things.

I remember when mobile phones were relatively new for kids that schools introduced a policy of getting teens to hand them in each morning and then picking them up at the end of the day

he process of storing and distributing thousands of mobile phones each day just doesn’t seem workable anymore.

as kids return to school, and the location of many Pokemon GO characters is found within schools, I’m intrigued to see how the young people, teachers and school administrators handle this one

So how should adults react to this new App which has quickly raced to number 1 on the download charts since being released in limited number of countries?

Here are a few things that I think we should all keep in mind about this particular form of gaming

Celebrate that Pokemon GO is getting the kids outdoors

Know that your kids will bump into others while out searching for Pokemon

Computer gaming at home has been around for 40 years and it mostly occurs unseen and behind closed doors

What’s unique about Pokemon GO is that your kids will encounter other people while using the game

Make them aware of this so they can quit playing and return home before they run their battery flat and lose real connectivity with you

Ignore 99 percent of the media stories about Pokemon GO

To understand why, you need to know a little about the media cycle

In the first 24 hours all the stories about about Pokemon GO were positive; about how amazing the game is. But journalists can’t keep writing that same story as it’s boring and nobody will read it

there will be a thousand more negative stories to emerge because Pokemon GO is a hot topic and media organisations are desperate for content parents will click on

So why ignore them? Because most of them come under the category of “life happens.” Yes your child may trip while going for a walk.

But so is sitting in their bedroom constantly leading a sedentary lifestyle with little natural light.

make sure when your child returns you connect to learn about their experience

This game gives us a whole new way to connect with our kids and demonstrate our love and interest

Maybe even go for a walk with them and let them show you how it all works


liz
My area of concentration and expertise is on educating children on how to be safe and appropriate online, essentially being an excellent digital citizen.  I also focus on the closely related subject of parenting issues and challenges of raising children in this hyper-digital age.  This area involves both parents and educators as the job of educating kids becomes a community effort.

 As related to my area of focus, the arrival of Pokemon Go had a tremendous impact.  I received numerous questions related to safety, limits and appropriate behavior when engaged, or maybe engrossed, in Pokemon Go.  Certainly I addressed the specifics of this game as it relates to safety and children.  However, the underlying foundation of educating children on digital citizenship remains consistent across the many many applications that exist and that is for parents and educators to do the following:

  1. Understand the app that is being used.  What are the issues? How does it work? Are there safety/privacy settings.  Parents/educators must educate themselves on where children are spending their time and what they are doing online.
  2. Build credibility with the children. If parents/educators understand the app and can speak the language, they can gain credibility with their audience, children.  Talk to kids about being a trainer, about the location of Pokestops, the use of Lures, Squirtle. Charizard, etc.  If the adult does not have credibility, the education process cannot take place.
  3. Engage the child.  The key to success in educating children on any topic is to engage them and peak their interest.  Obviously this will keep them interested in the subject matter.  But most importantly, it will take an abstract concept (digital citizenship) and make it more concrete for the student.  It allows for connections to be made in their brains from the abstract concept to how it relates to them.  Application of concepts become much easier for them.

 How does this relate to Pokemon Go?  I see this as a tremendous educational opportunities for many students, but not all.  Based on #3 above, Pokemon Go engages the child and provides educators and parents with some exciting ways to make less interesting learning far more exciting.  In Marialice’s blog, she cites some wonderful activities that use Pokemon Go as the content, but engage the student to write, be creative, story tell, etc.  Edtech can also be greatly engaged.  For example, have the student developed a Prezi and present to the class on a topic of choice, i.e. the history of a Pokestop, the 5 most interesting Pokestops, etc. Liz Repking | Principal | Cyber Safety Consulting

Leave a Comment